Transurethral cystolitholapaxy

A transurethral cystolitholapaxy is the most common procedure used to treat adults with bladder stones. Cystolitholapaxy is a safe and effective operation to treat bladder stones

What is transurethral cystolitholapaxy?

A transurethral cystolitholapaxy is the most common procedure used to treat adults with bladder stones. Cystolitholapaxy is a safe and effective operation to treat bladder stones. This is a minimally-invasive procedure where the stones in the bladder are destroyed with a laser and all the pieces are removed, without the need for any incisions. The procedure may be done at the same time as another procedure to treat the prostate, such as a transurethral resection of the prostate or GreenLight laser vapourization or Aquablation of the prostate.

A transurethral cystolitholapaxy is carried out under either a local anaesthetic or a general anaesthetic, so you shouldn’t feel any pain during the procedure.

 

After anasthesia, the urologist surgeon inserts a small, rigid tube (cystoscope) under camera guidance into the urethra and up into the bladder. The camera is used to help locate the bladder stones. Thereafter, either a Holmium laser fibre is inserted through the scope to help transmit the laser light energy to the stone. The laser transmitted energy breaks up the stones into smaller fragments, which can be washed out of your bladder with fluids.

There’s a risk of developing an infection during the procedure, so you may be given antibiotics as a precaution. There’s also a small risk of injury to the bladder.

Potential risks and complications

Although the operation is very safe, a number of potential risks exist.

These include the following:
– Bleeding
– Infection
– Temporary inability to urinate
– Bladder irritation causing increased frequency and urgency of urination
– Burning during urination
– Scarring along the opening of the bladder, requiring additional treatments in the future
– Regrowth of bladder stones
– General risks associated with anasthesia

Source : Dr. Zorn
Image sources: Heidelberg Clinic for Prostate Therapy

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